GEET 312 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
History of the Women’s Rights Movement
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEET 312
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course examines the history of the women’s rights movement and will analyze the ways that women have mobilized over the 20th and 21st centuries. Historical analysis will be used to trace how the women’s rights movement began, evolved and the divisions among different women’s groups. A special emphasis will be made on the history of the women’s rights movement in Turkey.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • to compare and contrast the first, second and third waves of feminism
  • to identify key events and thinkers that define the different waves of feminism
  • to analyze the relationship between gender and the state
  • • to compare and contrast the women’s rights movement in different states such as the United States, United Kingdom and Turkey
  • to identify key issues of debate within the women’s rights movement currently
  • to trace the history of the women’s rights movement in Turkey
Course Content This course aims to give students insight into women’s rights movement of the 20th and 21st century by comparing and contrasting the different waves of feminism. The contribution of international organizations, particularly the United Nations will be discussed in greater detail and a special emphasis will be made on the women’s rights movement in Turkey.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction Bell hooks,Feminism is for Everybody, Pluto Press 2000 (Ch. 1 Feminist Politics, p. 1-7)
2 Introduction to First Wave Feminism Mary Wollestonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women
3 First Wave Feminism and the Suffrage Movement Finnegan, Margaret. 1999. Selling Suffrage. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.
4 Film Screening – Iron Jawed Angels
5 First Wave International Women’s Movement Rupp, Leila. 1997. Worlds of Women. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
6 Women and the Anti-War Movement Cythia Cockburn, From Where We Stand, Zed Books, 2007
7 Second Wave Feminism Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex, Vintage Books, 1989 Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique (50th Anniversary Edition), W.W. Norton, 2015
8 Third Wave Feminism Astrid Henry, Not My Mother’s Sister Gillis et al, Third Wave Feminism, A Critical Exploration, Indiana University Press, 2004
9 Midterm Exam
10 United Nations and Women’s Conferences Meyer and Prugl
11 Gender and the State Meyer and Prugl, Chp. 1, Lorber, Judith. Paradoxes of Gender, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994.
12 Fourth Wave Feminism? Kira Cochrane, All the Rebel Women: The Rise of the Fourth Wave of Feminism
13 Ottoman Women’s Movement Serpil Çakır, Osmanlı Kadın Hareketi, Metis Yayınları, 2010
14 History of Turkey’s Women’s Rights Movement Serpil Sancar, Türk Modernleşmesinin Cinsiyeti, İletişim Yayınları, (4. Baskı), 2017
15 Class Presentations
16 Review of the Semester  

 

Course Textbooks

 

Enloe, Cynthia. Bananas, Beaches and Bases, University of California Press

De Beauvoir, SimoneThe Second Sex, Vintage Books

Lorber, Judith.  Paradoxes of Gender, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994.

Meyer, Mary K. And Elisabeth Prugl.  Gender Politics in Global Governance, New York: Rowman and Littleford Publishers, 1999. 

Corrin, Chris.  Feminist Perspectives on Politics, London: Pearson Prentice Hall, 1999.  

Freedman, Estelle, ed., The Essential Feminist Reader, New York: Modern Library Classics Edition, 2007

Gamble, Sarah, ed., The Routledge Companion to Feminism and Postfeminism, London: Routledge, 2001

References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
20
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
40
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
3
60
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
1
16
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
23
Final / Oral Exam
1
30
    Total
165

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1

To have sufficient background in Mathematics, Basic sciences and Biomedical Engineering areas and the skill to use this theoretical and practical background in the problems of the Biomedical Engineering.

2

To identify, formulate and solve Biomedical Engineering-related problems by using state-of-the-art methods, techniques and equipment; to select and apply appropriate analysis and modeling methods for this purpose.

3

To analyze a complex system, system components or process, and to design with realistic limitations to meet the requirements using modern design techniques; to apply modern design techniques for this purpose.

4

To choose and use the required modern techniques and tools for analysis and solution of complex problems in Biomedical Engineering applications; to skillfully use information technologies.

5

To design and do simulation and/or experiment, collect and analyze data and interpret results for studying complex engineering problems or research topics of the discipline. 

6

To efficiently participate in intradisciplinary and multidisciplinary teams; to work independently.

7

To communicate both in oral and written form in Turkish; to have knowledge of at least one foreign language; to have the skill to write and understand reports, prepare design and production reports, present, give and receive clear instructions.

8

To recognize the need for lifelong learning; ability to access information, to follow developments in science and technology, and to continue to educate him/herself.

9

To behave ethically, to be aware of professional and ethical responsibilities; to have knowledge about the standards in Biomedical Engineering applications.

10

To have information about business life practices such as project management, risk management, and change management; awareness of entrepreneurship, innovation, and sustainable development.

11

To have knowledge about contemporary issues and the global and societal effects of engineering practices on health, environment, and safety; awareness of the legal consequences of Biomedical Engineering solutions.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest