EEE 311 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Control Systems
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
EEE 311
Fall/Spring
2
2
3
6

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The main objective of this course is to introduce the fundamental concepts feedback control and dynamical systems. The course begins with an introduction of the history of automatic control and then introduces the mathematical foundations of the system design by reviewing the Laplace transform and the solution of differential equations. State variable methods will be introduced and employed for the analysis of the feedback control systems.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • be able to derive the Block Diagram Models and Signal Flow Graph Models of physical dynamic systems;
  • be able to find The Time Response and the State — Transition Matrix;
  • understand the significance of the essential concepts of The S Plane Root Location and the Transient Response, The Steady — State Error of Feedback Control Systems, and the Performance Indices;
  • have learnt how to perform the stabilty analysis of Feedback Control Systems via The Routh—Hurwitz Stability Criterion;
  • grasp the fundamentals of The Root — Locus Procedure, comprehend importance of the Parameter Design by the Root — Locus Method;
  • acquire the concepts of the Stability in the Frequency Domain employing The Nyquist Criterion, the Relative Stability, and Time Domain Performance Criteria in the Frequency Domain;
  • be able to apply learnt techniques for analysis and design of control systems using MATLAB.
Course Content Analysis and synthesis of continuous and sampleddata linear feedback control systems. Properties and advantages of feedback systems. Timedomain and frequencydomain performance measures. Stability and degree of stability. Nyquist criterion. Frequencydomain design. Root locus method. Compensation techniques. Application to a wide variety of physical systems. Some previous laboratory experience with electronic systems is assumed.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to Control Systems, 1.2 Brief History of Automatic Control; 1.3 Examples of Control Systems 101.4 Engineering Design 171.5 Control System Design 181.6 Mechatronic Systems 21 Chapter 1. Sections 16. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
2 Mathematical Models of Systems2.2 Differential Equations of Physical Systems 502.3 Linear Approximations of Physical Systems 552.4 The Laplace Transform 582.5 The Transfer Function of Linear Systems 65 Chapter 2. Sections 15. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
3 Mathematical Models of Systems2.5 The Transfer Function of Linear Systems 652.6 Block Diagram Models 792.7 SignalFlow Graph Models 842.8 Design Examples 902.9 The Simulation of Systems Using Control Design Software 113 Chapter 2. Sections 59. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
4 State Variable Models 3.2 The State Variables of a Dynamic System 1623.3 The State Differential Equation 1663.4 SignalFlow Graph and Block Diagram Models 1713.5 Alternative SignalFlow Graph and Block Diagram Models 182 Chapter 3. Sections 15. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
5 State Variable Models 3.6 The Transfer Function from the State Equation 1873.7 The Time Response and the State Transition Matrix 1893.8 Design Examples 1933.9 Analysis of State Variable Models Using Control Design Software 206 Chapter 3. Sections 69. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
6 Feedback Control System Characteristics 4.2 Error Signal Analysis 2374.3 Sensitivity of Control Systems to Parameter Variations 2394.4 Disturbance Signals in a Feedback Control System 2424.5 Control of the Transient Response 2474.6 SteadyState Error 2504.7 The Cost of Feedback 2534.8 Design Examples 254 Chapter 4. Sections 18. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
7 The Performance of Feedback Control Systems 5.2 Test Input Signals 3055.3 Performance of SecondOrder Systems 3085.4 Effects of a Third Pole and a Zero on the SecondOrder System Response 3145.5 The sPlane Root Location and the Transient Response 3205.6 The SteadyState Error of Feedback Control Systems 3225.7 Performance Indices 330 Chapter 5. Sections 17. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
8 The Stability of Linear Feedback Systems 6.1 The Concept of Stability 3876.2 The Routh—Hurwitz Stability Criterion 3916.3 The Relative Stability of Feedback Control Systems 3996.4 The Stability of State Variable Systems 401 Chapter 6. Sections 14. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
9 The Root Locus Method 7.2 The Root Locus Concept 4447.3 The Root Locus Procedure 4497.4 Parameter Design by the Root Locus Method 4677.5 Sensitivity and the Root Locus 473 Chapter 7. Sections 15. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
10 The Root Locus Method 7.6 PID Controllers 4807.7 Negative Gain Root Locus 4927.8 Design Examples 4967.9 The Root Locus Using Control Design Software 510 Chapter 7. Sections 69. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
11 Frequency Response Methods 8.2 Frequency Response Plots 5568.3 Frequency Response Measurements 5778.4 Performance Specifications in the Frequency Domain 5798.5 Log Magnitude and Phase Diagrams 582 Chapter 8. Sections 15. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop © 2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
12 Stability in the Frequency Domain 9.2 Mapping Contours in the sPlane 6369.3 The Nyquist Criterion 6429.4 Relative Stability and the Nyquist Criterion 6539.5 TimeDomain Performance Criteria in the Frequency Domain 6619.6 System Bandwidth 668 Chapter 9. Sections 16. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
13 The Design of Feedback Control Systems10.2 Approaches to System Design 74510.3 Cascade Compensation Networks 74710.4 PhaseLead Design Using the Bode Diagram 75110.5 PhaseLead Design Using the Root Locus 75710.6 System Design Using Integration Networks 76410.7 PhaseLag Design Using the Root Locus 76710.8 PhaseLag Design Using the Bode Diagram 77210.9 Design on the Bode Diagram Using Analytical Methods 776 Chapter 10. Sections 19. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
14 Design of State Variable Feedback Systems11.2 Controllability and Observability 83511.3 FullState Feedback Control Design 84111.4 Observer Design 84711.5 Integrated FullState Feedback and Observer 85111.6 Reference Inputs 85711.7 Optimal Control Systems 85911.8 Internal Model Design 869 Chapter 11. Sections 18. Modern Control Systems, 12/E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
15 Digital Control Systems13.2 Digital Computer Control System Applications 98513.3 SampledData Systems 98713.4 The zTransform 99013.5 ClosedLoop Feedback SampledData Systems 99513.6 Performance of a SampledData, SecondOrder System 999 Chapter 13. Sections 13.113.6. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
16 Digital Control Systems13.7 ClosedLoop Systems with Digital Computer Compensation 100113.8 The Root Locus of Digital Control Systems 100413.9 Implementation of Digital Controllers 100813.10 Design Examples 100913.11 Digital Control Systems Using Control Design Software 101813.12 Sequential Design Example: Disk Drive Read System 1023 Chapter 13. Sections 13.713. Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583

 

Course Textbooks Modern Control Systems, 12 / E, Dorf & Bishop ©2011  |  Prentice Hall , ISBN10: 0136024580 | ISBN13: 9780136024583
References Modern Control Engineering, 5 / E, Ogata, ©2010,  Prentice Hall, Published: 08/25/2009, ISBN10: 0136156738 | ISBN13: 9780136156734Control System Design, 1 / E, Goodwin, Graebe & Salgado, ©2001, Prentice Hall, Published: 09/26/2000 ISBN10: 0139586539, ISBN13: 9780139586538Feedback Control Systems, 4 / E, Phillips & Harbor©2000, Prentice Hall,  Published: 08/09/1999, ISBN10: 0139490906, ISBN13: 9780139490903

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
Laboratory / Application
5
20
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
4
20
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
30
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
70
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
2
32
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
2
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
4
5
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
30
    Total
176

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1

To have sufficient background in Mathematics, Basic sciences and Biomedical Engineering areas and the skill to use this theoretical and practical background in the problems of the Biomedical Engineering.

2

To identify, formulate and solve Biomedical Engineering-related problems by using state-of-the-art methods, techniques and equipment; to select and apply appropriate analysis and modeling methods for this purpose.

3

To analyze a complex system, system components or process, and to design with realistic limitations to meet the requirements using modern design techniques; to apply modern design techniques for this purpose.

4

To choose and use the required modern techniques and tools for analysis and solution of complex problems in Biomedical Engineering applications; to skillfully use information technologies.

5

To design and do simulation and/or experiment, collect and analyze data and interpret results for studying complex engineering problems or research topics of the discipline. 

6

To efficiently participate in intradisciplinary and multidisciplinary teams; to work independently.

7

To communicate both in oral and written form in Turkish; to have knowledge of at least one foreign language; to have the skill to write and understand reports, prepare design and production reports, present, give and receive clear instructions.

8

To recognize the need for lifelong learning; ability to access information, to follow developments in science and technology, and to continue to educate him/herself.

9

To behave ethically, to be aware of professional and ethical responsibilities; to have knowledge about the standards in Biomedical Engineering applications.

10

To have information about business life practices such as project management, risk management, and change management; awareness of entrepreneurship, innovation, and sustainable development.

11

To have knowledge about contemporary issues and the global and societal effects of engineering practices on health, environment, and safety; awareness of the legal consequences of Biomedical Engineering solutions.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest